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  • Cluster feeding is when a baby groups several breast feedings closer together at a certain point in the day.  Usually cluster feeds occur in the evening hours.   Dur

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Series on Safety

Posted by Shelly
Shelly
Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
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on Thursday, January 09 2014
in General Info

Today we will be starting a series on safety by age group.  Please check back daily for new posts.

 

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Infant Safety

Posted by Shelly
Shelly
Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
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on Thursday, January 09 2014
in Infants

Infant Safety

  • Crib mattress should fit snugly into crib
  • All crib surfaces should be smooth
  • A bumper guard/pads should not be installed as this may contribute to a danger of suffocation
  • No pillows, stuffed animals, comforters or blankets  should be used in the crib
  • Lower the crib mattress to the lowest level before your child can get to a sitting position on his own
  • Never turn your back on the baby while changing a diaper, even if using the strap on the changing table
  • Infants should be placed in a rear facing infant car seat in a vehicle.   Check your car seat manufacturer guidelines on height/weight limits.  Most babies are ready to move to a rear facing convertible car seat between 6- 9 months of age.
  • Check frequently for safety recalls on your infant products.
  • Always be careful with toddlers and small babies.  Toddlers do not understand how strong they are and can hurt an infant accidentally.
  • Be careful of pets around infants.  A pet’s natural protective instinct is to scratch or bite and small children can accidentally get hurt.  Larger dogs can also unknowingly knock over bouncy seats, car seats, and swings.

 

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Welcome 2014!!!

Posted by Shelly
Shelly
Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
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on Wednesday, January 08 2014
in General Info

At the start of each new year, many of us wish for peace, health, and prosperity.   Here are some cute quotes found on Pinterest that may inspire you.

  • Dear Lord, All I ask for is a chance to prove that winning the lottery won't make me a bad person.  

if you don't win the lottery this year, you can wish for this...

  •  I dream of a better world where chickens can cross the road without having their motives questioned.  

for those who want to eat healthier in 2014...

  • You can't buy happiness, but you can buy cupcakes.  And that's kind of the same thing.
  • Chocolate comes from cocoa which comes out of a tree,  That makes it a plant.  Therefore, chocolate counts as salad.  The end.

And our final words of wisdom for the day...

-Do not spoil what you have by desiring what you have not;  but remember that what you now have was once among the things you only hoped for.

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Finger Foods for Babies

Posted by Shelly
Shelly
Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
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on Wednesday, January 08 2014
in Parenting Tips

By the time they're 9 months old, most babies have developed the fine motor skills — the small, precise movements — needed to pick up small pieces of food and feed themselves.

Allow your child to self-feed as much as possible, though you'll still be helping out by spoon-feeding cereal and other important dietary elements. Encouraging finger feeding helps your child learn about textures and independence.  If you have not already done so, it is time to introduce table/finger foods.  Do not limit your baby to just Gerber puffs.

By 9 months, most babies are ready to try table food and should be able to try many of the things that you eat.    Here are some suggestions.

  • Zucchini, carrots, potatoes, sweet potatoes, beans, or other well-cooked veggies.
  • Pieces of ripe banana, soft pears or peaches, and cooked apples
  • Well-cooked pasta
  • Dry cereals and crackers such as cheerios, graham crackers, & ritz crackers.  Ask yourself, does it melt in the mouth? Some dry cereals and crackers that are light and flaky will melt in the mouth.
  • Shredded cheeses  and  cottage cheese
  • Small pieces of soft, cooked beef and chicken are other good choices

Food should be cut into small pieces. The sizes will vary depending on the food's texture.   You should avoid the following foods that can be choking hazards.

  • Pieces of raw vegetables or hard fruits
  • Whole grapes, berries, cherry or grape tomatoes (instead, peel and slice or cut in quarters)
  • Raisins and other dried fruit
  • Peanuts, nuts, and seeds
  • Peanut butter and other nut or seed butters
  • Whole hot dogs and sausages (peel and cut these in very small pieces)
  • Untoasted bread, especially white bread that sticks together
  • Chunks of cheese or meat
  • Candy (hard candy, jelly beans, gummies, chewing gum)
  • Popcorn, pretzels, corn chips, and other snack foods
  • Marshmallows

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Eczema

Posted by Shelly
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Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
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on Tuesday, January 07 2014
in Info on illnesses

Atopic dermatitis (eczema) is a red itchy inflammation of the skin. It's a long-lasting (chronic) condition.  The cause of atopic dermatitis is not clear, but it affects the skin's ability to hold moisture. Skin becomes dry, itchy, and easily irritated.  Eczema may affect any area of the body, but it typically appears on the arms and behind the knees. It tends to flare periodically and then subside.

back_of_knees_eczema

There is no cure for eczema, but the goal in treating eczema is for a child to be comfortable.

  • Moisturize often. Creams work better than lotions.
  • Bathe with lukewarm water and for short periods daily.
  • Avoid things that trigger rashes, such as harsh soaps and detergents.
  • Control scratching. You may want to cover the rash with a bandage to keep your child from rubbing it. Put mittens or cotton socks on your baby's hands to help prevent him or her from scratching.  Oral antihistamines, such as Benadryl, can reduce the sensation of itching. Topical antihistamines are not recommended.
  • To treat the inflamed, itchy rash areas, most pediatricians and dermatologists will use very mild prescription strength cortisone (steroid) creams. These creams are applied two until the rash clears or the itching stops.

For more info on eczema visit, www.nationaleczema.org

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Infant seat, Convertible seat, Booster...How do I choose?

Posted by Shelly
Shelly
Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
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on Monday, January 06 2014
in General Info

We often get questions from parents about car seats.  When do I change car seats?  When can my child face front?  When can we stop using a car seat?  We hope that this info will answer some of those questions.

In this first stage, most parents use an infant carrier/car seat combo with base.  These safety seats are used only in the rear facing position for infants approximately 5-30 lbs and less than 30 in.  Most babies will use this type of seat until about 9-12 months of age.  These types of safety seats are convenient for parents, because they are easy to get the baby in and out of the car and can be used as an infant carrier.

infant carrier

Some parents chose to start with a convertible car seat.  Convertible car seats can be used in the rear facing position for infants weighing 5-30 lbs and can then be converted to forward facing for older children from 22-40lbs.  The benefit of this type of safety seat is that your child can use this seat from birth to about 40 lbs (about 4 years).  The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends keeping children rear facing until as close to age 2 as possible.  Many parents will use this type of safety seat from about 12 months to 4 years of age.

convertible car seat 2

Harness Booster safety seats can be used for children weighing 22-40lbs in the forward position only.  This seat uses the 5 point harness system and most harness booster seats will convert to belt positioning seats for children over 40 lbs.  This type of seat is good for children over 2yrs of age and will last your child for several years.

harness booster

Belt Positioning Booster seats elevate and position children so that the vehicle lap and shoulder belt fit them properly.  This type of seat is for those children who have outgrown their convertible or harness booster seats.  They are for kids over 40lbs.  Texas law requires that children stay in a belt positioning booster seats until they are 8 yrs old or until they reach 4ft 9in in height.

belt positionng boosterbooster

This information is intended to be a guide for parents.  Each manufacturer will have the specific weight and height limits on the side or back of the safety seat.  Be sure to check the guidelines for your specific car seat.  If there is a topic that you would like more info on, email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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Kids Punch for New Year's Eve

Posted by Shelly
Shelly
Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
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on Monday, December 30 2013
in Recipes

Here is a recipe for the kids on New Year's Eve.

Pink Champagne Punch

1 12-ounce bottle white grape juice
1 6-ounce can frozen lemonade concentrate, thawed
1 16-ounce pkg. frozen whole strawberries, thawed
1 12-ounce can lemon-lime soda, chilled
8 cherries (optional)

Combine 1/2 of the grape juice, lemonade, and strawberries in a blender. Whirl until smooth and pour into drink container. Repeat steps 1 and 2 with remaining juice, lemonade, and strawberries. Add soda and stir well. Pour into 8 fancy plastic glasses. Add a cherry to the glass for garnish.

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Merry Christmas

Posted by Shelly
Shelly
Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
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on Tuesday, December 24 2013
in General Info

mannger 2

As we celebrate Christmas this year, this is a good time to reflect on the year and be thankful for our many blessings.  Over the years Christmas has become a holiday filled with presents, Santa, lights, and decorations.  All of the festivity is a fun way to celebrate, but it is also important for us to remember the true meaning of the celebration.  For people of the Christian faith, Christmas is one of the most significant times of the year.  The history of Christmas started from when Jesus was born and it is all about celebrating his birth, giving gifts to our King and Savior, and being thankful to God for our many blessings.  So as you celebrate the miracle of our Savior’s birth with your loved ones, remember to take a  few moments during this wonderful season to think not just about buying presents and decorating the tree, but think of those in the world who are not as fortunate and give thanks for all that we are blessed with.

Wishing you a Merry Christmas and a blessed New Year.

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RSV in Infants

Posted by Shelly
Shelly
Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
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on Wednesday, December 18 2013
in Info on illnesses

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), which causes infection of the lungs and breathing passages, is a major cause of respiratory illness in young children. RSV is highly contagious and can be spread through droplets containing the virus when someone coughs or sneezes. It also can live on surfaces (such as countertops or doorknobs) and on hands and clothing, so can be easily spread when a person touches something contaminated. Because RSV can be easily spread by touching infected people or surfaces, frequent hand washing is key in preventing its transmission. Fortunately, most cases of RSV are mild and require no specific treatment from doctors. RSV season is usually from fall to early spring and we are already seeing cases in the community. Antibiotics aren't used because RSV is a virus and antibiotics are only effective against bacteria. Medication may sometimes be given to help open respiratory airways. If your child gets RSV or other respiratory viruses there are some things that you can do at home to make them feel better.

Make a child with an RSV infection as comfortable as possible, allow time for recovery, and provide plenty of fluids.

The last part can be tricky, however, because babies may not feel like drinking. In that case, offer fluids in small amounts at more frequent intervals than usual.

To help your child breathe easier, use a cool-mist vaporizer to keep the aire moist. If your child is uncomfortable & too young to blow his/her nose, use a nasal aspirator or bulb suction to remove nasal secretions.

Treat fever with acetaminophen as needed.

For more info see www.kidshealth.org

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Constipation

Posted by Shelly
Shelly
Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
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on Friday, December 06 2013
in Info on illnesses

Constipation is a very common problem among kids, but many parents are confused about what constipation really is. A child is considered constipated when he or she has fewer than three bowel movements in a week; has difficulty having a bowel movement; or when the stools are hard, dry, and unusually large.  A child who doesn't have a bowel movement every day isn't necessarily constipated.  Here is a diagram of types of stool.

109598518

Constipation:  Stool types 1 and 2

Normal Stools:  Stool types 3 and 4

Loose/Diarrhea Stools:  Stool types 5,6, and 7

Most of the time, constipation is due to a diet that doesn't include enough water and dietary fiber.   Here are some things that you can do if your child is constipated.

•Give your child more fluids. Drinking enough water and other liquids helps stools move more easily through the intestines. Most school-age children need 3 to 4 glasses of water each day. If your infant is constipated during the transition from breast milk or into solid foods, try serving just a few ounces of prune juice each day.

•Serve more fiber. Foods that are high in fiber, such as fruits, vegetables, and whole-grain bread, can help prevent constipation. Fiber can't be digested, so it helps clean out the intestines by moving the bowels along. Fiber doesn't have to be a turn-off for kids: Try apples, oatmeal, oranges, bananas, baked potatoes, and popcorn.

•Make sure kids get enough exercise. Physical activity helps the bowels move, so encourage your kids to get plenty of exercise.

•Develop a regular meal schedule. Eating is a natural stimulant for the bowels, regular meals may help kids develop routine bowel habits.

•Get kids into the habit of going at the same time each day to set a routine.   Have your child sit on the toilet for at least 10 minutes at about the same time each day, preferably after a meal.

Even if you do all of the right things, some kids will still have problems with constipation.  If you have questions about your child, call the office at (281)292-0999.

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The Stressful Holiday Season

Posted by Shelly
Shelly
Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
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on Wednesday, December 04 2013
in Parenting Tips

The holidays are a fun time of year for most children with the anticipation of getting gifts, seeing family and being out of school. It is also an important time of year to be mindful of your children's safety.  Here are some tips to keep everyone safe.

  • Mistletoe, holly, poinsettias, and other plants are commonly used as decorations during the holidays. Like many plants, these are considered potentially poisonous and should be kept out of the reach of kids.
  • Alcohol poisoning is a common risk for children during the holiday season. Many parents host holiday parties where alcohol is served. Parents must take care to remove all empty and partially empty cups as soon as possible. Because kids imitate adults, many may drink the beverages they see adults drinking.
  • The needles of holiday trees, ornament hooks, and staples on package bows can cause painful cuts in the mouth and throat of a child who puts them in their mouth or swallows them.
  • Tree ornaments, light bulbs, icicles, tinsel, and small toys are potential choking hazards for small children because they may block the airway.
  • Keep breakable ornaments out of young kids' reach — or keep them off the tree until your children are older. If one does break, clean up the broken glass quickly.
  • Keep in mind that artificial snow and flocking materials are not edible, so you may want to avoid them if there are younger children in the home.
  • Be careful of heavy stocking holders that toddlers and preschoolers can pull down on top of themselves, which is becoming an increasing common hazard as use of these heavy stocking hangers become more popular.
  • Candles should never be left unattended, placed in an area where they can be easily knocked over or near flammable curtains or decorations.
  • Common holiday foods such as peanuts or popcorn are potential choking hazards and should not be given to children under age 4.

Always remember that the hustle and bustle of the holidays can be stressful on children and adults.  Try to slow down and spend time with family and friends to celebrate the reason for the season. 

Merry Christmas Everyone!!!

 

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Fever Is Your Friend

Posted by Shelly
Shelly
Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
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on Monday, December 02 2013
in Info on illnesses

It’s 2 am. Your youngest child is upset and crying. And… they’re hot. The thermometer you have reads 102. You’re nervous. Your child is nervous. Fever can feel like your family’s worst enemy.

Believe it or not, and despite the fear often associated with it, fever is often your child’s friend.   Fever revs up the body’s immune system and activates it to fight off any viral or bacterial “invaders.”   So, when your child has a fever, it means her body is doing its job.  

Most pediatric experts agree: a fever is a temperature equal to or greater than 100.5 degrees.  That’s why when you make an appointment for your child for a “fever” we sometimes push you on the details: 100.2 you say?  Not a fever.  Felt your child and thought he was hot but didn’t take the temperature? Might have been a fever, but might not have.  We want to know, when possible, the actual temperature and how you took it (under the arm, in the mouth, in the ear, or on the skin).  Your child’s temperature depends on a number of factors, including how you take it. The closer we get to the core of the body, the more accurate it is. That’s why, when we measure the temperature of a baby, we often want to take the temperature in the baby’s bottom.  For older kids, a temperature taken in the mouth or the bottom is much more accurate than a temperature taken under the armpit.

A child’s age also matters a lot when it comes to fever.   Any child under a month of age needs to be evaluated by a doctor immediately if they have a fever, even if it only occurs once.

As kids get older and older, we are less concerned about low-grade fevers in otherwise healthy and vaccinated kids, but recommend an evaluation if your child has had a temperature for more than 2-3 days (or anytime you are concerned).  

Some things do worry us when it comes to fever. We worry when the fever lasts several days without a good explanation for it.  We worry when your child becomes dehydrated.  We worry when your child is lethargic. We worry when your child is not fully vaccinated.  Most of all, we worry about how your child “looks” overall, which is why we pay a lot of attention to this when you call or come in.  

It also doesn’t matter if the Acetaminophen or Ibuprofen you’ve been giving to treat your child’s fever makes it go away and stay away.  These medications are for your child’s comfort but don’t help to fight off the virus or bacteria your child has.  If they don’t completely eliminate the fever, it doesn’t mean they aren’t working, just that they wore off like they are supposed to.

Fever can be scary, but knowing what a fever does for the body is helpful. On average, kids will have 4 to 6 acute episodes of fever from birth to 2 years of age, so fever is here to stay, whether we like it or not. Think of it as an (often annoying, but very helpful) friend.

 

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Giving Thanks

Posted by Shelly
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Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
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on Thursday, November 21 2013
in General Info

As we approach Thanksgiving, we feel that it is important to teach our children that the day is not just about turkey and pumpkin pie, but about being thankful for each other and our many blessings, big and small.  Below is a link to a Focus on the Family article about teaching children  (by age groups) about giving thanks. 

We hope that everyone has a safe and blessed Thanksgiving. 

 

http://www.focusonthefamily.com/parenting/articles/give_thanks.aspx

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Infants 101

Posted by Shelly
Shelly
Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
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on Wednesday, November 13 2013
in Infants

New parents often have questions about caring for their new baby.  Here are some common topics related to newborns:

Umbilical Cords

  • Your baby’s umbilical cord stump should be kept clean and dry until it falls off.  The cord will usually fall off after the first couple of weeks of life.  Fold the baby's diaper below the stump or buy newborn diapers with a cut-out space for the cord so it's exposed to the air and won't come in contact with urine.  Sometimes you may see some yellowish discharge underneath the dried cord and there may be some oozing of blood for a few days as the cord separates.   If you notice discharge from your baby’s cord, you can apply a small amount of rubbing alcohol with a cotton ball to help dry it out.  Don't be afraid to lift up the dry part of the cord in order to apply rubbing alcohol to the moist part below. Call us immediately if there is red streaking, swelling or inflammation around the cord.

Infant Acne

  • Baby acne is pimples and whiteheads that develop on a newborn's skin. Baby acne can occur anywhere on the face, but usually appears on the cheeks, nose and forehead.  It commonly begins at two to three weeks of age and is usually gone before your baby is six months old. Baby acne is thought to be caused by Mom's hormones, which are still circulating in baby's bloodstream.   There's little you can do to prevent baby acne. The best treatment for baby acne is usually no treatment at all.

Swollen Breast Tissue

  • It's normal for babies (boys and girls) to have mild or even swollen, enlarged breasts and/or lumps under the nipple.  This is normal and it is from the effects of hormones that the baby received from his or her mother.  The same hormones that cause the mother's breasts to swell and milk glands to be stimulated can do the same to the baby's breasts. Their breasts may even secrete small amounts of milk, and while alarming to most parents, this is nothing to be worried about and the effects will wear off in a few weeks to months

Newborn Genitals

  • Girls:  Your newborn girl's genitals have been exposed to many hormones in the uterus. Newborns genitals are usually a little swollen and prominent for the first week.  Girls may also have a thick, milky discharge in the vagina.  At 2 or 3 days of age, your daughter may have a little bit of bleeding from her vagina. This is perfectly normal -- it is caused by the withdrawal of the hormones she was exposed to in the womb.   Clean your daughter's genitals as you would any other part of her body. Spread the labia and gently wash out the creases; there is no need to go any deeper. Nature takes care of naturally cleaning the inside of the vagina. Use warm water only -- there's no need for soaps. Remember, this sensitive tissue is the same as that inside the mouth.
  • Boys:  Three or four times a day, you will need to clean the circumcised area with warm water. Soap is not necessary. At each diaper change, you will want to apply a small amount of petroleum jelly to keep the area moist. It can take several days for the scab over an incision to fall off, and about the same amount of time or a little longer for the plastibell to fall off. Be sure not to pull on the plastibell as it can cause soreness and bleeding. After the circumcision is healed,  no further care is needed outside of normal good hygiene.

Peeling Skin

  • When babies are in the womb, they are covered with a white substance called vernix that is made up of shed skin cells and oil gland secretions. This waxy material protects your baby's skin until birth. After the vernix is washed off, the top layer of a baby's skin begins to dry up and peel off.  As newborn babies adjust to life outside the womb, the appearance of their skin may be startling to new parents.  During the first few weeks, your baby may have peeling or cracking of the skin, especially on the wrists, hands, ankles and feet. The peeling can last for the first few weeks of life. Overdue babies seem to peel more than babies born closer to their due date. This is normal and no treatment is necessary.  New babies also commonly develop bumps and rashes during the first weeks of life, but these skin conditions are usually normal and harmless. After your baby sheds the top layer of his skin, the underlying layer should be normal and healthy.  Do not try to treat your baby's peeling skin with harsh lotions or scented products, and do not scrub or try to peel your baby's skin.  Such measures can irritate sensitive newborn skin. Peeling newborn skin does not need to be treated because it is a normal part of your baby's development.

Cradle Cap

  • Cradle cap, the common term for infantile seborrheic dermatitis, causes scaly patches on a baby's scalp. Though cradle cap isn't serious, it can cause thick crusting and white or yellow scales.  Cradle cap usually resolves on its own within a few months. Self-care measures, such as washing your baby's scalp daily with a mild shampoo, can help loosen and remove the cradle cap scales.

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Flu is here!!!!

Posted by Shelly
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Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
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on Wednesday, November 13 2013
in General Info
We have cases of the flu in The Woodlands.  If you have not gotten your flu vaccine, we recommend that you get it soon.  We still have some flu vaccines available, so call for an appointment before we run out.  (281)292-0999
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Sad to see her go...

Posted by Shelly
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Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
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on Monday, November 11 2013
in General Info
We are very sad to have to say goodbye to Audra (back office Medical Assistant).  Audra has decided to stay home to take care of her new baby.  Audra, we are happy for you, but we will really miss you!!!!
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Lice

Posted by Shelly
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on Monday, November 11 2013
in Info on illnesses

The head louse is a tiny, wingless parasitic insect that lives among human hairs and feeds on extremely small amounts of blood drawn from the scalp. Although they may sound gross, lice (the plural of louse) are a very common problem, especially for kids ages 3 years to 12 years.

Lice aren't dangerous and they don't spread disease, but they are contagious and can just be  annoying. Their bites may cause a child's scalp to become itchy and inflamed, and persistent scratching may lead to skin irritation and even infection.   Though very small, lice can be seen by the naked eye.   The adult louse is no bigger than a sesame seed and is grayish-white or tan.  Lice eggs (called nits) look like tiny yellow, tan, or brown dots before they hatch. Lice lay nits on hair shafts close to the scalp, where the temperature is perfect for keeping warm until they hatch. Nits look sort of like dandruff, only they can't be removed by brushing or shaking them off.

You want to treat head lice quickly as soon as you notice them because they can spread easily from person to person.  Lice are highly contagious and can spread quickly from person to person, especially in group settings (schools, childcare centers, slumber parties, sports activities, and camps).

Though they can't fly or jump, these tiny parasites have specially adapted claws that allow them to crawl and cling firmly to hair.  They spread mainly through head-to-head contact, but sharing clothing, bed linens, combs, brushes, and hats can also help pass them along. Kids are most prone to catching lice because they tend to have close physical contact with each other and often share personal items.

We recommend that you use a medicated shampoo, cream rinse, or lotion to kill the lice. These may be over-the-counter (OTC) or prescription medications, depending on what treatments have already been tried.  Medicated lice treatments usually kill the lice and nits, but it may take a few days for the itching to stop.

Here are some simple ways to get rid of the lice and their eggs, and help prevent a lice reinfestation:

  • Wash all bed linens and clothing that's been recently worn by anyone in your home who's infested in very hot water (130° F [54.4° C]), then put them in the hot cycle of the dryer for at least 20 minutes.
  • Have bed linens, clothing, and stuffed animals and plush toys that can't be washed dry-cleaned. Or, put them in airtight bags for 2 weeks.
  • Vacuum carpets and any upholstered furniture (in your home or car).
  • Soak hair-care items like combs, barrettes, hair ties or bands, headbands, and brushes in rubbing alcohol or medicated shampoo for 1 hour. You can also wash them in hot water or just throw them away.
  • Because lice are easily passed from person to person in the same house, bedmates and infested family members will also need treatment to prevent the lice from coming back
lcie
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New Pediatric Urgent Care in Our Area

Posted by Shelly
Shelly
Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
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on Friday, November 08 2013
in General Info

If your kids are sick in the evening or on a weekend, check out Urgent Care for Kids. This is an after hours urgent care clinic specifically for children.

URGENT CARE FOR KIDS urgentcare

1640 Lake Woodlands
The Woodlands, TX 77380
281-367-0010
3pm-10pm Mon-Fri
9am-9pm Sat-Sun
www.urgentcarekids.com

 

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Puberty

Posted by Shelly
Shelly
Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
User is currently offline
on Thursday, November 07 2013
in Teen Info

Your daughter is asking about getting her first bra, and your son comes home from soccer practice smelling like he's been digging on a road crew all day. What's going on? Welcome to puberty, the time when kids sprout up & fill out. Pubertal changes usually happen between ages 10 and 14 for girls and ages 12 and 16 for boys.

  • In females:
    • The first sign of puberty is usually breast development.
    • Other signs are the growth of hair in the pubic area and armpits, and acne.
    • Menstruation (or a period) usually happens last, about 1-2 yrs after breast development begins.
  • In males:
    • Puberty usually begins with the testicles and penis getting bigger.
    • Then hair grows in the pubic area and armpits.
    • Muscles grow, the voice deepens, and acne and facial hair develop as puberty continues.

Just as those hormones change the way the body looks on the outside, they also create changes on the inside. During puberty, kids might feel confused or have strong emotions that they have never had before. Kids might feel overly sensitive or become upset easily. Some kids lose their tempers more often and get angry with their friends or families. They also may feel anxious about how their changing body looks. Sometimes it can be hard to deal with all these new emotions. It's important to know that the your body is adjusting to the new hormones, so is the mind. You can remind your child that people usually aren't trying to hurt their feelings or upset them on purpose. It might not be the family or friends — it might be your new "puberty brain" trying to adjust.

For more info check out this link. http://kidshealth.org/parent/growth/growing/understanding_puberty.html

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Over the Counter Meds- What is What?

Posted by Shelly
Shelly
Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
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on Wednesday, November 06 2013
in Info on illnesses

With so many medications available over the counter (OTC) how do you tell what is what?  Many parents have a hard time making sense of it all.  Below is a breakdown of the common ingredients & classes of OTC meds and what they are used for.

Fever Reducers/ Pain Relievers – These medications work to reduce fever and treat pain.

Antihistamines –Antihistamines counteract the effects of histamine, a chemical released by the body during allergic reactions.  They can make people sleepy, but many infants and children sometimes become irritable after taking antihistamines.  Diphenhydramine, Brompheniramine, & Chlorpheniramine are common OTC antihistamines.

Decongestants - Decongestants are the medications that treat stuffy, congested noses.   It's important to note that decongestants do not relieve a runny or itchy nose.  Decongestants can make some children irritable.  Pseudoephedrine and Phenylepherine are common OTC decongestants.

Cough suppressant - Cough suppressants are intended to decrease coughing by acting on the brain to suppress the urge to cough.  Dextromethorphan is a common OTC cough medicine.

Expectorants – Expectorants thin mucus and make it easier to cough up.

Many cold, cough, and allergy products are a mixture of 2 of the above medications.  When choosing a cold medication for your child, remember…

  • For infants and children under age 4, use a cool mist humidifier in their room, normal saline & nasal suctioning as needed.
  • Cold medications are not recommended for children under age 4.
  • Children may have reactions to medications that alter their temperament.
  • Select meds that treat the symptoms that your older child is having.

If you have questions about medication dosing, visit our the “Resources” section of our website www.totdoc.com

If there is a topic that you would like info on, email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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