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  • Chickenpox (varicella) is a contagious illness that causes an itchy rash and red spots or blisters/pox all over the body. Chickenpox is caused by the varicella-zoster virus. It
  • •Children should wear life jackets at all times when on boats or near bodies of water. •Make sure the life jacket is the right size for your child. The jacket should not be loose.

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Mosquito Bites in kids

Posted by Shelly
Shelly
Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
User is currently offline
on Friday, May 16 2014
in Info on illnesses

Mosquitos have been a big problem in our area for the past few weeks.  When a mosquito bites an individual, various chemicals are injected into the skin. The red bumps are actually the body's reaction to these chemicals.   Most insect bites result in a red bump.  Some are larger (like a hive) and some have a small water blister in the center.  These are normal reactions to an insect bite.  Mosquito bites of the upper face can cause eyelid to swell up for several days.  With bites, the swelling can be red as well as large (especially age 1-5 years).  Insect bites of the upper face can cause severe swelling around the eye, but this is usually harmless.  The swelling is usually worse in the morning after lying down all night. It will improve after standing for a few hours.  If your child develops a fever, irritability or the skin in the area of the bite is tender to touch, call the office.   If you think you've been bitten by a mosquito, wash the bite with soap and water.  Put on some calamine lotion anti-itch cream to stop the itching.  Placing an ice pack on the bite may also help.   The best way to avoid mosquito bites is to wear an insect repellent.   Since mosquitoes lay their eggs in water, it's also a good idea to empty out buckets, flower pots, toys, and other things in your yard that may have collected water during a rainstorm.  Wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants to keep mosquitoes away from your skin.

Let’s test your knowledge about mosquito bites. 

True or False

A large hive at the bite site means your child is having an allergic reaction. False- this is a normal reaction

The area is red and there is a clear dot in the middle.  This means that the bite is infected.  False – this is a normal reaction

Most insect bites are itchy for several days.  True

The area may be red, pink, and swollen for up to 7 days.  True

 

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Toddler Temper Tantrums

Posted by Shelly
Shelly
Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
User is currently offline
on Tuesday, May 13 2014
in Parenting Tips

Toddler temper tantrums are something very common. Between the ages of one and three, your previously sweet and loving toddler will have a change of personality. He may no longer be content to accept your rules for everything, but will want everything his own way. Quite frequently, this will result in a toddler temper tantrum. When a toddler starts having tantrums, the first thing the parents should do is decide what is important and what isn't important. Once you do decide what is important, don't give in. Make sure your rules are constant. A toddler has a tantrum to try and get what they want. If this usually works, they will continue to have tantrums. If, on the other, a tantrum never produces the result they want, they will soon give it up as ineffective. The following are a number of things you can do when your child is in the middle of a tantrum, without having to give in:

Ignore him.

Most tantrum-throwers are trying to attract attention. If you don't give him that attention, he will lose interest and stop the tantrum.

Send him to bed or to his room.

This gives both of you a cooling down period.

Leave him.

Obviously, don't take your eyes off the child if you do this in public.

Distract him.

Start to play with a new toy, get your child a drink, go outside for a walk. Do whatever it takes to get your toddler's mind off the problem.

Toddler temper tantrums are part of a child's development. They can't be completely avoided, but hopefully the amount of time your child spends in a tantrum can be reduced.

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Cheesy Spaghetti Squash

Posted by Shelly
Shelly
Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
User is currently offline
on Thursday, May 08 2014
in Recipes

Getting children to eat veggies can be a challenge!  Try to make it interesting and different.  Here is a recipe for cheesy spaghetti squash that tastes like mac and cheese. 

Ingredients

1/2 Tbsp flour

salt & pepper

1/4 cup milk (1%)

1/4 cup Tex Mex blend shredded cheese

1 1/2 cups spaghetti squash, cooked

1 Tbsp Parmesan cheese, shredded

Directions

Preheat oven to 350. Spray a small casserole dish with cooking spray. Set aside.

In a small saucepan, over medium heat, whisk together flour and salt & pepper. Slowly whisk in milk until smooth. Cook and stir until thickened. Remove from heat and stir in Tex-Mex cheese until melted and smooth.

In a bowl, stir the cheese sauce into the cooked spaghetti squash until well combined. Spread in prepared casserole dish.

Sprinkle with the Parmesan cheese.

Bake at 350 for about 20 minutes, until cheese is melted and squash is heated through.

*you can add cubed ham or chicken as well*

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Zucchini Chips

Posted by Shelly
Shelly
Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
User is currently offline
on Thursday, May 08 2014
in Recipes

Getting children to eat veggies can be a challenge!  Try to make it interesting and different.  Here is a recipe for zucchini chips to try with your kids.

1/4 cup  dry breadcrumbs 

1/4 cup  (1 ounce) grated fresh Parmesan cheese 

1/4 teaspoon  seasoned salt 

1/4 teaspoon  garlic powder 

1/8 teaspoon  freshly ground black pepper 

2 tablespoons  fat-free milk 

2 1/2 cups  (1/4-inch-thick) slices zucchini (about 2 small) 

 Cooking spray 

Preheat oven to 425°.

Combine first 5 ingredients in a medium bowl, stirring with a whisk. Place milk in a shallow bowl. Dip zucchini slices in milk, and dredge in breadcrumb mixture. Place coated slices on an ovenproof wire rack coated with cooking spray; place rack on a baking sheet. Bake at 425° for 30 minutes or until browned and crisp. Serve immediately

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Insect Repellent

Posted by Shelly
Shelly
Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
User is currently offline
on Thursday, May 01 2014
in Parenting Tips

Many parents often ask if insect repellent is safe to use on their children. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that repellents with DEET should not be used on infants less than 2 months old. Here are some helpful hints when using repellent on a child that is over 2 mo of age.

  • Apply insect repellent to your own hands and then rub them on your child. Avoid children's eyes and mouth and use it sparingly around their ears.
  • Do not apply repellent to children's hands. (Children may tend to put their hands in their mouths.)
  • Do not use insect repellent on open wounds
  • Do not allow young children to apply insect repellent to themselves; have an adult do it for them.
  • Keep repellents out of reach of children.
  • Avoid scented soaps and other things that might attract mosquitoes
  • Use mosquito netting over strollers to protect
  • Wash off insect repellents with soap and water once you bring your baby inside

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Vomiting and Diarrhea

Posted by Shelly
Shelly
Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
User is currently offline
on Thursday, May 01 2014
in Info on illnesses

Vomiting can be caused by many things. Most of the time, vomiting in children is caused by gastroenteritis, usually due to a virus infecting the gastrointestinal tract.  Gastroenteritis or stomach virus can also cause nausea and diarrhea.

Vomiting and diarrhea usually do not last more than a few days.   Oral rehydration is something parents can do at home to help prevent dehydration or treat mild cases of illness.

Here are some tips:

  • Offer your child small amounts of oral electrolyte solution frequently.  We recommend giving about ½ to 1 ounce every 20-30 minutes.  If you offer too much, too soon, it will upset your child’s stomach and they can vomit.  Frozen oral electrolyte solution popsicles are also a good choice for children.
  • Once your child can keep this amount down for about an hour, you can gradually increase the amount of solution you're giving.   
  • After your child goes for about 6-8 hours without vomiting, you can begin to reintroduce formula and/or solid foods slowly.   
  • If your infant is exclusively breastfeeding and vomits (not just spits up, but vomits what seems like the entire feeding) more than once, then you can decrease the amount of time that you breastfeed by half.  You should offer feedings more frequently than usual.  (For example, feed for a total of 5-10 minutes every 2 hours)   After about 6- 8 hours without vomiting, you can resume breastfeeding normally.
  • For older children (over age 2) appropriate clear liquids include:  : ice chips or sips of water,  oral electrolyte solutions, frozen oral electrolyte solution pops, Gatorade/powerade, and Ginger Ale/7-up/Sprite.

Signs of dehydration:

  • Fewer than 4 wet diapers/day in infants or no urination for 6-8 hours.  Children should urinate at least once every 6-8 hours.
  • Dry mouth that looks sticky inside
  • Few or no tears when crying
  • Fussy behavior in infants
  • The soft spot on an infant's head that looks flatter than usual or somewhat sunken
  • Sunken eyes
  • Appears weak or limp

Vomiting due to gastroenteritis can spread to others, so your child should stay home from school or childcare until there's been no vomiting for at least 24 hours. And remember that hand washing is the best way to protect your family against many infections.

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Hand, Foot, & Mouth Disease

Posted by Shelly
Shelly
Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
User is currently offline
on Monday, April 28 2014
in Info on illnesses

In the past couple of weeks, we have seen quite a few children with hand, foot, mouth disease. Here is some info on this common childhood illness.

 Hand, foot, & mouth (HFM) disease is a virus that is common among children from 6months to 4 yrs of age. If your child has hand, foot, & mouth disease, you may see red spots and/or blisters on the hands, feet, face, buttocks. Your child may also have small ulcers or sores in his/her mouth and a low grade fever. The fever and discomfort caused by HFM usually lasts 3-4 days and mouth sores typically resolve within 7 days. The sores on the body can last up to 10 days. Feed your child a soft diet and encourage plenty of fluids. Cold drinks & popsicles are good choices for children with mouth pain. HFM is contagious. Children may return to school or daycare once they are fever free for 24hrs.

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What Does Lethargic Mean?

Posted by Shelly
Shelly
Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
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on Thursday, April 24 2014
in Info on illnesses

When parents bring their sick child into the office, we will ask questions such as:

  • What are your child’s symptoms?
  • How has your child been sleeping?
  • Has your child’s appetite changed?
  • How has your child’s activity level been?

By asking these questions, we are trying to assess how the illness is affecting your child.  In pediatrics, it is very common for parents to report that their child has been lethargic when sick.  Bantam Medical Dictionary defines lethargy as:  a degree of inactivity and unresponsiveness approaching or verging on unconscious.  If a child is truly lethargic, parents should be very concerned.  Being truly lethargic is a medical emergency.

Most children are actually having a decreased activity level when ill.  Decreased activity level is when a child is laying around on the couch, sleeping or resting, and watching TV, and not running around playing.  A decreased activity level is normal during illness.   It is the body’s way of forcing rest as it recovers from the illness. 

 

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Molluscum Contagiosum

Posted by Shelly
Shelly
Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
User is currently offline
on Friday, April 18 2014
in Info on illnesses

Molluscum contagiosum is a common skin disease that is caused by a virus. The disease is generally mild and should not be a reason for concern or worry.  Molluscum infection causes small white, pink, or flesh-colored bumps or growths with a dimple or pit in the center. The bumps are usually smooth and firm and can appear anywhere on the body. They may become sore, red, and swollen but are usually painless.

molluscum_sperling_lg

molluscum_on_body_thb

The bumps normally disappear within 6 to 12 months without treatment and without leaving scars.  People with this skin disease can cause the bumps to spread to different parts of their body by touching or scratching a bump and then touching another part of the body.  The virus can also be spread from person to person.  This can happen if the growths on one person are touched by another person. It can also happen if the virus gets on an object that is touched by other people such as towels, clothing, and toys.

How to prevent spreading

  • Wash hands well
  • Do not scratch or pick
  • Keep the bumps covered
  • Do not share towels or other personal items

Treatment

There are treatments for molluscum such as…

  • Surgical removal by scraping the lesions off the body
  • Freezing the lesions with liquid nitrogen

However, treatment is not usually required because the bumps disappear on their own.   Molluscum may not go away completely for up to 4 years. In addition, not all treatments are successful for all people.

Information obtained at www.cdc.gov

 

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Heating Breastmilk, Formula, and Baby Food

Posted by Shelly
Shelly
Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
User is currently offline
on Thursday, April 10 2014
in Parenting Tips

Many parents ask us what is the best way to heat up their baby's food.  Here are some recommendations from the Food and Drug Administration.

Breast milk or Formula (for bottles with disposable inserts or hard plastic and glass bottles)

  • In Hot Tap Water
    Place bottle under hot, running tap water until the desired temperature is reached. This should take one-to-two minutes.
  • On the Stove
    Heat water in a pan. Remove the pan from the heat and set the bottle in it until it's warm.

***When heating baby's milk, always shake the liquid to even out the temperature and test on top of your hand - not the wrist (this is one of the areas least sensitive to heat) - before feeding. Milk that's "baby-ready" should feel lukewarm.

Heating breast milk or infant formula in the microwave is not recommended. Studies have shown that microwaves heat baby's milk and food unevenly. This results in "hot spots" that can scald a baby's mouth and throat.


Safe Microwaving of Solid Foods

Studies show that the when baby food is microwaved in a jar, it's often heated unevenly. The hottest places are in the center of the foods. The coolest places are next to the glass sides, which could lead you to believe that the food is not too hot. Follow these precautions when microwaving baby's food.

  • Don't microwave baby foods in the jar. Instead, transfer the food to a dish before microwaving it. This way the food can be stirred and taste-tested for temperature.
  • Microwave 4 ounces of solid food in a dish for about 15 seconds on high power. Always stir, let stand 30 seconds, and taste-test before feeding.
  • Don't heat baby-food meats, meat sticks or eggs in the microwave. Use the stovetop instead. These foods have a high fat content, and since microwaves heat fats faster than other substances, these foods can cause splattering and overheating.

***When heating baby's food, always stir, let stand 30 seconds, and taste-test before feeding. Food that's "baby-ready" should taste or feel lukewarm.

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Toddler Diarrhea

Posted by Shelly
Shelly
Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
User is currently offline
on Wednesday, April 09 2014
in Toddlers

Toddler's diarrhea is a common condition in children between the ages of 6 months and three years old. Its only symptoms are loose, watery stools, and although these children have chronic diarrhea, they have a normal appetite and are not considered contagious. Chronic diarrhea can be caused by drinking too much juice or food/drinks with high sugar content.

 It is recommended to limit sugary drinks and foods.  Reducing the fat and fiber in the diet may also help.

 

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Is it a cold or allergies?

Posted by Shelly
Shelly
Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
User is currently offline
on Wednesday, April 02 2014
in Info on illnesses

Colds are caused by hundreds of different viruses. When one of these viruses gets into your body, your immune system attacks. Some of the effects of this immune response are the classic symptoms of a cold, such as congestion and coughing.  The germs that cause colds are contagious. You can pick them up when an infected person sneezes, coughs, or you touch the germs with your hands.  Colds can last 10-14 days and do not respond to antibiotics.

Allergies are caused by an overactive immune system. For some reason, your body mistakes harmless substances -- such as mold or pollen -- for germs and attacks them. Your body releases chemicals such as histamine, just as it does when fighting a cold. This can cause swelling in your nasal passages, a runny nose, coughing, and sneezing. Allergies are not contagious, although some people may inherit a tendency to develop them.

Characteristic

Cold

Allergy

Duration

three-14 days

Days to months -- as long as you are exposed to the allergen

Time of year

Most often in the winter, but possible at any time

Any time of the year -- although the appearance of some allergens are seasonal

Onset of Symptoms

Symptoms take a few days to appear after infection with the virus.

Symptoms can begin immediately after exposure to the allergen

Cough

Often

Sometimes

Aches

Sometimes

Never

Fatigue

Sometimes

Sometimes

Fever

Sometimes

Never

Itchy, Watery eyes

Rarely

Often

Sore Throat

Often

Sometimes

Runny or Stuffy Nose

Often; usually yellow mucus

Often; usually clear mucus

 

If you have questions or concerns about your child’s symptoms please call the office.

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Insect Repellent and Kids

Posted by Shelly
Shelly
Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
User is currently offline
on Tuesday, April 01 2014
in Parenting Tips

It is the time of year that mosquitos are out and about in our yards.  It is important to protect yourself and your child from mosquito bites.  Many parents often ask if insect repellent is safe to use on their children. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that repellents with DEET should not be used on infants less than 2 months old. Here are some helpful hints when using repellent on a child that is over 2 mo of age.

  • Apply insect repellent to your own hands and then rub them on your child. Avoid children's eyes and mouth and use it sparingly around their ears.
  • Do not apply repellent to children's hands. (Children may tend to put their hands in their mouths.)
  • Do not use insect repellent on open wounds
  • Do not allow young children to apply insect repellent to themselves; have an adult do it for them.
  • Keep repellents out of reach of children.
  • Avoid scented soaps and other things that might attract mosquitoes
  • Use mosquito netting over strollers to protect
  • Wash off insect repellents with soap and water once you bring your baby inside

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Cold Symptoms in Infants

Posted by Shelly
Shelly
Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
User is currently offline
on Thursday, March 27 2014
in Infants

Most infants will get a cold several times during the first 2 yrs of life.  Babies with a cold can have the following symptoms:

  • A low-grade fever of about 100.4 F
  • Sneezing
  • Coughing
  • Decreased appetite
  • Irritability
  • Difficulty sleeping
  • Trouble nursing or taking a bottle due to nasal congestion

Unfortunately, there's no cure for the common cold. Antibiotics don't work against cold viruses. Treatment for the common cold in babies involves easing their symptoms.

The best you can do, is try to make your baby more comfortable.  Below are some home care measures that you can do. 

  • Use saline nasal drops followed by nasal suctioning to clear the nasal passages of mucus. 
  • Keep the air in your home moist by using a cool mist humidifier where your baby sleeps.
  • Elevate the head of your baby’s bed when sleeping.
  • Offer fluids frequently. 
  • Over-the-counter medications should generally be avoided in infants.
  • Fever-reducing medications may be used if needed.  Refer to the dosing chart on our website under the “Resources” tab.
  • Many parents like to use Camphor/Menthol Rubs or Vapor Rubs on their children’s chest for cough and congestion.  We do not recommend using these in children under age 2 and never for children with asthma or reactive airway disease. 
  • There are formulas specifically for babies over 3 months that do not contain camphor.  One example is called Baby Rub.  It contains aloe, eucalyptus oil, rosemary oil, and lavender oil.  We would recommend that you not use this on your baby’s face or neck.  You should always be cautious, as creams/oils can irritate sensitive skin. 


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Finger Foods for Babies

Posted by Shelly
Shelly
Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
User is currently offline
on Tuesday, March 25 2014
in Parenting Tips

By the time they're 9 months old, most babies are ready for more texture in their food and have developed the fine motor skills — the small, precise movements — needed to pick up small pieces of food and feed themselves.

Allow your child to self-feed as much as possible, though you'll still be helping out by spoon-feeding. Encouraging finger feeding helps your child learn about textures and independence.  If you have not already done so, it is time to introduce table/finger foods.  Do not limit your baby to just Gerber puffs.

By 9 months, most babies are ready to try table food and should be able to try many of the things that you eat.    Here are some suggestions.

  • Zucchini, carrots, potatoes, sweet potatoes, beans, or other well-cooked, soft veggies.   
  • Pieces of ripe banana, soft pears or peaches, and cooked apples
  • Well-cooked pasta
  • Dry cereals and crackers such as cheerios, graham crackers, & ritz crackers.  Ask yourself, does it melt in the mouth? Some dry cereals and crackers that are light and flaky will melt in the mouth.
  • Shredded cheeses  and  cottage cheese
  • Small pieces of soft, cooked beef, turkey, and chicken are other good choices

Food should be cut into small pieces. The sizes will vary depending on the food's texture.   You should avoid the following foods that can be choking hazards.

  • Pieces of raw vegetables or hard fruits
  • Whole grapes, berries, cherry or grape tomatoes (instead, peel and slice or cut in quarters)
  • Raisins and other dried fruit
  • Peanuts, nuts, and seeds
  • Peanut butter and other nut or seed butters
  • Whole hot dogs and sausages (peel and cut these in very small pieces)
  • Untoasted bread, especially white bread that sticks together
  • Chunks of cheese or meat
  • Candy (hard candy, jelly beans, gummies, chewing gum)
  • Popcorn, pretzels, corn chips, and other snack foods
  • Marshmallows

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Head Injuries

Posted by Shelly
Shelly
Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
User is currently offline
on Monday, March 17 2014
in Info on illnesses

Recently there has been a lot of media attention given to head injuries in pre-teen and teen athletes.  Schools, HealthCare providers, & Coaches all have a heightened awareness about this dangerous condition.  As a parent, what do I need to know?

A concussion is a form of mild brain injury that can occur after a blow to the head, such as a fall, but is most commonly associated with hits to the head during sports.  After the hit or blow to the head, a child with a concussion may lose consciousness, may forget things that happened before or after the injury (amnesia), could have a seizure, or could have one or more of the classic concussion symptoms described below.

•Physical symptoms - headaches, nausea, fatigue, visual problems, balance problems, sensitivity to light or noise, numbness and tingling, vomiting, dizziness

•Mental (thinking) symptoms - feeling mentally foggy, having problems concentrating or remembering, feeling slowed down

•Emotional symptoms - irritability, sadness, nervousness, or simply feeling more emotional

•Symptoms that affect sleep - drowsiness, sleeping more or less than usual, or having trouble falling asleep

More severe "red flag" symptoms that might indicate your child needs immediate medical attention might include a worsening headache, seizures, repeated vomiting, increasing confusion, or unusual changes in behavior, etc.

Parents, teachers, coaches, trainers, and a child who has had a concussion should be aware of all of these possible symptoms as he or she returns to school and sporting activities and should understand the importance of reporting all symptoms.  Experts now recommend a six-step gradual return to play plan for kids who have a concussion, with athletes moving to the next stage only if they remain free of all concussion symptoms.  Using this plan, the earliest a player with a concussion would be back in a normal game would be six days.

These return to play guidelines includes:

1. No activity - a recovery stage with complete physical and cognitive rest. This means no exercise or sports, but can also mean not going to school, or having a shortened day. This is a time to get lots of rest, get plenty of sleep, and eat well.

2. Light aerobic exercise to increase their heart rate (keep to less than 70% of maximum predicted heart rate), including walking, light jogging, swimming, or stationary cycling, but no resistance training.

3. Sport-specific exercise to add movement, such as skating drills or running drills, moderate jogging, brief running, moderate-intensity stationary cycling, but no head impact activities.

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Keeping Kids Busy on Road Trips

Posted by Shelly
Shelly
Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
User is currently offline
on Wednesday, March 12 2014
in Parenting Tips

Many families will be taking road trips during Spring Break this week.  Here are some ideas to keep kids busy and hopefully avoid the comments "how much longer until we get there" and "I'm bored".

http://travel.kaboose.com/road-trip-keem-them-busy.html

 

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Fever is Your Friend

Posted by Shelly
Shelly
Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
User is currently offline
on Friday, March 07 2014
in Info on illnesses

It’s 2 am. Your youngest child is upset and crying. And… they’re hot. The thermometer you have reads 102. You’re nervous. Your child is nervous. Fever can feel like your family’s worst enemy.

Believe it or not, and despite the fear often associated with it, fever is often your child’s friend.   Fever revs up the body’s immune system and activates it to fight off any viral or bacterial “invaders.”   So, when your child has a fever, it means her body is doing its job.  

Most pediatric experts agree: a fever is a temperature equal to or greater than 100.5 degrees.  That’s why when you make an appointment for your child for a “fever” we sometimes push you on the details: 100.2 you say?  Not a fever.  Felt your child and thought he was hot but didn’t take the temperature? Might have been a fever, but might not have.  We want to know, when possible, the actual temperature and how you took it (under the arm, in the mouth, in the ear, or on the skin).  Your child’s temperature depends on a number of factors, including how you take it. The closer we get to the core of the body, the more accurate it is. That’s why, when we measure the temperature of a baby, we often want to take the temperature in the baby’s bottom.  For older kids, a temperature taken in the mouth or the bottom is much more accurate than a temperature taken under the armpit.

A child’s age also matters a lot when it comes to fever.   Any child under a month of age needs to be evaluated by a doctor immediately if they have a fever, even if it only occurs once.

As kids get older and older, we are less concerned about low-grade fevers in otherwise healthy and vaccinated kids, but recommend an evaluation if your child has had a temperature for more than 2-3 days (or anytime you are concerned).  

Some things do worry us when it comes to fever. We worry when the fever lasts several days without a good explanation for it.  We worry when your child becomes dehydrated.  We worry when your child is lethargic. We worry when your child is not fully vaccinated.  Most of all, we worry about how your child “looks” overall, which is why we pay a lot of attention to this when you call or come in.  

It also doesn’t matter if the Acetaminophen or Ibuprofen you’ve been giving to treat your child’s fever makes it go away and stay away.  These medications are for your child’s comfort but don’t help to fight off the virus or bacteria your child has.  If they don’t completely eliminate the fever, it doesn’t mean they aren’t working, just that they wore off like they are supposed to.

Fever can be scary, but knowing what a fever does for the body is helpful. On average, kids will have 4 to 6 acute episodes of fever from birth to 2 years of age, so fever is here to stay, whether we like it or not. Think of it as an (often annoying, but very helpful) friend.

 

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Toddler Temper Tantrums

Posted by Shelly
Shelly
Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
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on Friday, March 07 2014
in Toddlers

Toddler temper tantrums are something very common. Between the ages of one and three, your previously sweet and loving toddler will have a change of personality. He may no longer be content to accept your rules for everything, but will want everything his own way. Quite frequently, this will result in a toddler temper tantrum. When a toddler starts having tantrums, the first thing the parents should do is decide what is important and what isn't important. Once you do decide what is important, don't give in. Make sure your rules are constant. A toddler has a tantrum to try and get what they want. If this usually works, they will continue to have tantrums. If, on the other, a tantrum never produces the result they want, they will soon give it up as ineffective. The following are a number of things you can do when your child is in the middle of a tantrum, without having to give in:

Ignore him.

Most tantrum-throwers are trying to attract attention. If you don't give him that attention, he will lose interest and stop the tantrum.

Send him to bed or to his room.

This gives both of you a cooling down period.

Leave him.

Obviously, don't take your eyes off the child if you do this in public.

Distract him.

Start to play with a new toy, get your child a drink, go outside for a walk. Do whatever it takes to get your toddler's mind off the problem.

Toddler temper tantrums are part of a child's development. They can't be completely avoided, but hopefully the amount of time your child spends in a tantrum can be reduced.

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Puberty

Posted by Shelly
Shelly
Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
User is currently offline
on Thursday, February 20 2014
in Teen Info

Your daughter is asking about getting her first bra, and your son comes home from soccer practice smelling like he's been digging on a road crew all day. What's going on? Welcome to puberty, the time when kids sprout up & fill out. Pubertal changes usually happen between ages 10 and 14 for girls and ages 12 and 16 for boys.

  • In females:
    • The first sign of puberty is usually breast development.
    • Other signs are the growth of hair in the pubic area and armpits, and acne.
    • Menstruation (or a period) usually happens last, about 1-2 yrs after breast development begins.
  • In males:
    • Puberty usually begins with the testicles and penis getting bigger.
    • Then hair grows in the pubic area and armpits.
    • Muscles grow, the voice deepens, and acne and facial hair develop as puberty continues.

Just as those hormones change the way the body looks on the outside, they also create changes on the inside. During puberty, kids might feel confused or have strong emotions that they have never had before. Kids might feel overly sensitive or become upset easily. Some kids lose their tempers more often and get angry with their friends or families. They also may feel anxious about how their changing body looks. Sometimes it can be hard to deal with all these new emotions. It's important to know that the your body is adjusting to the new hormones, so is the mind. You can remind your child that people usually aren't trying to hurt their feelings or upset them on purpose. It might not be the family or friends — it might be your new "puberty brain" trying to adjust.

For more info check out this link. http://kidshealth.org/parent/growth/growing/understanding_puberty.html

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