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Hives

Posted by Shelly
Shelly
Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
User is currently offline
on Monday, February 17 2014
in Info on illnesses

What are hives?

Hives are pink or red bumps or slightly raised patches of skin.    Hives can appear in groups or clusters and might change locations in a matter of hours.  Hives usually itch, burn and/or sting.

What causes hives?

  • Allergic reaction to things like foods, medications, insect stings/bites, lotions, or other substances
  • Exposure to the cold
  • Exercise
  • Sun exposure
  • Nervousness or stress
  • Infections caused by viruses

What can I do for hives?

No matter what the cause, a case of hives can last anywhere from a couple of days to a few weeks.  Most of the time you never find out exactly what caused the hives.  Oral antihistamines and cool compresses can help with the itching. Hives can reoccur even while taking antihistamine medication. 

If your child has hives and begins to have trouble breathing, the lips or tongue swell, or if the hives become severe emergency care may be needed. 

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Diaper Rash

Posted by Shelly
Shelly
Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
User is currently offline
on Monday, February 10 2014
in Info on illnesses

Diaper rashes are common in babies between 4 and 15 months old. They may be noticed more when babies begin to eat solid foods.  Diaper rashes caused by infection with a yeast or fungus called Candida are very common in children. Candida is found everywhere in the environment.  It grows best in warm, moist places, such as under a diaper. A yeast-related diaper rash is more likely to occur in babies who:

•Are not kept clean and dry

•Are taking antibiotics, or whose mothers are taking antibiotics while breast feeding

•Have more frequent stools

Other causes of diaper rashes include:

•Acids in the stool (seen more often when the child has diarrhea)

•Ammonia (produced when bacteria break down urine)

•Diapers that are too tight or rub the skin

•Reactions to soaps and other products used to clean cloth diapers

•Too much moisture

You may notice the following in your child's diaper area:

•Bright red rash that gets bigger

•Fiery red and scaly areas on the scrotum and penis in boys

•Red or scaly areas on the labia and vagina in girls

•Pimples, blisters, ulcers, large bumps, or pus-filled sores

•Smaller red patches (called satellite lesions) that grow and blend in with the other patches

Diaper rashes usually do NOT spread beyond the edge of the diaper.

The best treatment for a diaper rash is to keep the diaper area clean and dry. This will also help prevent new diaper rashes.

•Always wash your hands after changing a diaper

• Diaper creams help keep moisture away from baby's skin when applied to completely clean, dry skin

•Avoid using wipes that have alcohol or perfume. They may dry out or irritate the skin more

•Do NOT use corn starch on your baby's bottom. It can make a yeast diaper rash worse

•Do NOT use talc (talcum powder). It can get into your baby's lungs

•Change your baby's diaper often, and as soon as possible after the baby urinates or passes stool

•Lay your baby on a towel without a diaper on whenever possible. The more time the baby can be kept out of a diaper, the better

•Pat the area dry or allow to air-dry

•Put diapers on loosely. Diapers that are too tight don't allow enough air and may rub and irritate the baby's waist or thighs

•Use water and a soft cloth or cotton ball to gently clean the diaper area with every diaper change. Avoid rubbing or scrubbing the area. A squirt bottle of water may be used for sensitive areas

If you use cloth diapers:

•Avoid plastic or rubber pants over the diaper. They do not allow enough air to pass through

•Do NOT use fabric softeners or dryer sheets. They may make the rash worse

•When washing cloth diapers, rinse 2 or 3 times to remove all soap if your child already has a rash or has had one before

MEDICATIONS:

Diaper creams such as Triple Paste, Desitin, A&D ointment, Dr. Smith’s, & Boudreaux’s Butt Paste are good choices to treat diaper rash.  Topical antifungal skin creams and ointments will clear up infections caused by yeast.  Lotrimen AF and Triple Paste AF are available at your pharmacy without a prescription.

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How Long Do Cold Symptoms Last?

Posted by Shelly
Shelly
Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
User is currently offline
on Wednesday, February 05 2014
in Info on illnesses

How long will the cold symptoms last?

Most people think that the common cold will last a couple of days and then their child will be completely well and back to normal.  New research published in the British Medical Journal showed that in 90% of children, the common cold actually can take up to 15 days to resolve. This means that the sore throat, runny nose, stuffy nose, and cough may linger for some time.

What can I give my child for a cold?

  • Encourage your child to drink plenty of fluids.
  • Use a cool mist humidifier at the bedside.  This adds moisture to the air and helps to ease nasal congestion.
  • Saline nasal drops followed by suctioning helps to clear mucus from nasal passages in babies.  Older children can use saline nasal spray as needed.
  • Over the counter decongestants may be helpful for children over age 4.
  • Many parents want antibiotics to fight colds, but colds are caused by viruses.  Antibiotics work in our bodies to treat bacterial infections and will not work against a common viral illness.

When should I worry?

  • Sometimes a bacterial infection does follow a cold virus. Signs that you may have a bacterial infection after a cold are pain around the face and eyes that may worsen when bending over and coughing up thick yellow or green mucus. These symptoms may also occur with a cold. But if they last for more than a week or are severe, you should schedule an appointment.
  • If your child has fever for more than 3 days, they should be seen in the office.
  • Schedule an appointment if your child is overly fussy, not eating well, if they are complaining of ear pain, or if you have other concerns.

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Should I give my baby acetaminophen before he gets his vaccines?

Posted by Shelly
Shelly
Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
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on Wednesday, January 29 2014
in Pediatric News & New Research

Because receiving immunizations can cause a mild fever, many parents routinely give acetaminophen to children when they receive their vaccinations.  This common practice is actually not recommended by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  Fever is one of the signs that our body is generating an immune response and an immune response is part of what makes vaccines work to make us less susceptible to vaccine preventable diseases.   A recent medical study showed that receiving acetaminophen before vaccines could possibly reduce that immune response making the vaccines less effective.   Most children do well following vaccine administration and run only a low grade temperature or some do not run fever at all.  If your child is acting ill after vaccines or has risk febrile seizures, acetaminophen may be helpful in making them feel better.  Always talk to your child’s healthcare provider about questions such as this during your visit.

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Over the Counter Meds- What is What?

Posted by Shelly
Shelly
Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
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on Wednesday, January 29 2014
in General Info

With so many medications available over the counter (OTC) how do you tell what is what?  Many parents have a hard time making sense of it all.  Below is a breakdown of the common ingredients & classes of OTC meds and what they are used for.

Fever Reducers/ Pain Relievers – These medications work to reduce fever and treat pain. Tylenol, Acetaminophen, Ibuprofen, Advil, & Motrin are examples of OTC fever reducers/pain relievers.

Antihistamines –Antihistamines counteract the effects of histamine, a chemical released by the body during allergic reactions.  Antihistamines can help to reduce itching, sneezing, and dry up a runny nose.  They can make people sleepy, but many infants and children sometimes become irritable after taking antihistamines.  Diphenhydramine, Brompheniramine, & Chlorpheniramine are common OTC antihistamines.

Decongestants - Decongestants are the medications that treat stuffy, congested noses.   It's important to note that decongestants do not relieve a runny or itchy nose.  Decongestants can make some children irritable.  Pseudoephedrine and Phenylepherine are common OTC decongestants.

Cough suppressant - Cough suppressants are intended to decrease coughing by acting on the brain to suppress the urge to cough.  Dextromethorphan is a common OTC cough medicine.

Expectorants – Expectorants thin mucus and make it easier to cough up.

Many cold, cough, and allergy products are a mixture of 2 of the above medications.  When choosing a cold medication for your child, remember…

  • For infants and children under age 4, use a cool mist humidifier in their room, normal saline & nasal suctioning as needed.
  • Cold medications are not recommended for children under age 4.
  • Children may have reactions to medications that alter their temperament.
  • Select meds that treat the symptoms that your older child is having.

If you have questions about medication dosing, visit our the “Resources” section of our website www.totdoc.com

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Creativity and Imaginative Play in Kids

Posted by Shelly
Shelly
Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
User is currently offline
on Monday, January 20 2014
in Parenting Tips

Creativity and imaginative play are important parts of childhood.  This type of play promotes problem solving, helps develop critical thinking, enhances language skills, and helps to develop social skills.  The passive activities of going to the movies, watching TV, or interacting with electronic games are fun, but they can pull kids away from creative, imaginative play.  Here are ways to encourage creative and imaginative play:

  • Encourage mess- Crayons, play dough, finger paint, cutting and gluing all work on teaching kids about texture and develop fine motor skills.
  • Get moving- turn on the music and sing and dance.  Not only are these activities fun, but they also help burn off excess energy and help to develop coordination and balance.
  • Cook up something good- Let children measure and pour while cooking.  You can talk with them about shapes, fractions and math skills, learn about different cultural foods, food groups, and discuss healthy food choices.  Work some science into your cooking and show kids the change from liquid to solid form.
  • Build something – whether you are building something with blocks, making a tepee with chairs and blankets, or creating a fort from a cardboard box these activities teach kids about construction, develop gross and fine motor skills, and just may spark the inner interior decorator in your daughter.
  • Go on a nature hike – explore your yard and send kids on a scavenger hunt for types of plants, insects, or hidden treasure.  Give them a map or compass and teach them about direction as they search for things.
  • Repurpose items from your house – Instead of buying new furniture for your daughter’s Barbie house, use boxes, towels, and scrapbook paper to create your own furniture.  How about making a bow and arrow from sticks and string with your son.  Help your kids to create their own board game.  Make up the rules of the game and create a game board with construction paper.  These types of activities involve problem solving and creating thinking.

These are just some examples of ways to encourage your child’s creativity and imagination.  Share some of your ideas with us too.

 

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Helping Your Kids Develop Self Confidence

Posted by Shelly
Shelly
Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
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on Thursday, January 16 2014
in Parenting Tips

We all want our children to be happy, well adjusted, confident, and successful in life.  As parents we want our children to be the best soccer player, the fastest swimmer, be the best reader in their class or get into the best schools.  Many parents feel that creating a culture where every child is a winner will promote self-esteem in their kids, but ego inflation does not always equal self-confidence.

 

In cultures such as this, kids are not always encouraged to work harder.  The “everybody gets a trophy” mentality tells kids that they will get rewarded just for showing up.  Why should they put forth more effort if it is not necessary?  Does this mentality build healthy self-esteem or the sense of “I'm just fantastic, not because I did anything but just because I'm here”?  What happened to the philosophy of effort equals achievement?  And what about teaching kids how to lose gracefully and be a good sport?

The same principle can also be applied to children’s behavior and actions.  Sometimes as parents, we fail to hold our kids accountable for poor behavior or decisions because we are afraid our kids will think that we are being mean.  Oftentimes parents excuse their child’s bad behavior, finding it easier to blame others, including themselves, for their children's attitude or irresponsibility.   All kids will make mistakes or behave poorly, but it is important that kids are accountable for those mistakes or behaviors.   Parents can help kids achieve self-confidence through struggle and achievement, not through someone always telling them that they are number one or making excuses for their frequent outbursts.  Kids need to understand that all actions will result in a consequence.  Sometimes those consequences are positive and sometimes they are not.  It is a very important life lesson.  Self-confidence is developed when kids have the opportunity to learn from their mistakes, understand that there are always winners & losers, and deal with the consequences caused by their actions.

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Young Children and Screen Time

Posted by Shelly
Shelly
Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
User is currently offline
on Thursday, January 16 2014
in Parenting Tips

From TV to smart phones to tablets, the lives of children and families are dominated by media exposure.  More and more families are purchasing tablets for their young children and letting kids routinely play on smartphones.

 

The first two years of your child’s life are especially important in the growth and development of the brain. During this time, children need positive interaction with other children and adults. This is especially true at younger ages, when learning to talk and play with others is so important. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) discourages TV and other media use by children younger than 2 years and instead encourages interactive play for children.  Interactive play helps children develop social skills, gross and fine motor skills, and encourages language development and creativity.

For older children, total entertainment screen time should be limited to less than 1 to 2 hours per day of educational, nonviolent programs/games.   The AAP suggests that ALL screen time should be supervised by parents.

The AAP recommends that parents make a media use plan.  Media plans should include,

  • Mealtime and bedtime curfews for media devices
  • Screens should be kept out of kids’ bedrooms
  • A no-device rule during meals
  • A set family rules covering the use of the Internet and social media and cellphones and texting, including, which sites can be visited, who can be called and giving parental access to all social media  accounts.
  • Limits on  the amount of screen time for entertainment to less than two hours per day
  • Children younger than 2 shouldn't have any TV or Internet exposure

 

Information for this post was obtained from www.aap.org and    www.healthychildren.org

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#lovemykids #can'tgetthemofftheiPhone #whatisaparenttodo? (Parents, Kids, & Social Media)

Posted by Shelly
Shelly
Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
User is currently offline
on Thursday, January 16 2014
in Parenting Tips

So your kids have graduated from play dough, Legos, and Barbie, to iPad and iPhone.  With electronic devices comes access to social media.  As a parent, it is important to set limits, rules, and be aware of what your kids are doing on social media sites and to understand what they are saying.

  • Tablets and smartphones are not toys; they are a tool and a privilege.  You pay for it; therefore, you own it and can take it away if needed.
  • Have Rules and set limits on usage
  1. Who your child is allowed to call?
  2. How many minutes is your child allowed to use each month?
  3. Is your child allowed to text?
  4. What apps is your child allowed to use?
  5. At what time each night must the smartphone/tablet usage stop?  It is a good idea to have a central charging station for the family.  This ensures that kids are not up late on their devices and that sleep is not interrupted from that midnight text from a friend.
  6. Can the child bring the smartphone to school? Use it when hanging out with friends?
  7. Have a no device at mealtime rule to encourage family interaction.  How many times have you seen families in a restaurant and everyone is on their device?
  8. What are the consequences for breaking the rules?
  • Stress Quality over Quantity
  1. Make sure that kids understand that the number of friends or followers is not important.  Don’t make the goal to get 1000 followers.  Stress to kids that social media is a great way to stay connected to your friends and family.  Only have followers that are close enough to you that you want to share your personal pictures and words with.
  • It is important to talk to kids about how to treat others while texting/posting.  Teach kids to ask themselves:
  1. Would I say the words I am texting/posting to a person's face?
  2. What would my parents think if they read this text?
  3. Could this photo I am sending cause embarrassment to me, my friends, my family or anyone else?
  4. Can my words be taken out of context and used to hurt me or someone else?
  5. Talk to kids about sexting or sending inappropriate pictures.
  6. A good rule to go by is:  If I would be embarrassed if Grandma saw it, don’t post it or send it.
  • Set privacy settings and don’t let kids tag their location when they post. This alerts people to where your children are.
  • Parents should become familiar with Instagram, Snap Chat, Facebook, Twitter, Ask FM, and any other social media site that your child gets on.
  • Friend or follow your child so that you see what is going on.
  • Know the lingo – figure out the hashtags and abbreviations, if you can LOL!
  • TTFN (That’s all for now)

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Teen Safety

Posted by Shelly
Shelly
Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
User is currently offline
on Thursday, January 09 2014
in Teen Info

Teen Safety

Dating

  • Get to know someone well before going on a date.  Date people that you know and trust.  Go out in groups as much as possible and to public places.  If you want to spend some time alone with the person you're seeing, wait until you've had a few dates and have set ground rules for alone time.
  • Talk with your parents.   Never go on a date without telling someone else. Even if it's a little annoying, let your mom, dad or another adult know when you’re going out. Be sure to tell your parents who you're going with, where you plan to go and what time you expect to return home, too.
  • It's a good policy to bring your cell phone along, and to leave your date's phone number with your parents, just in case anything goes wrong. Be prepared for the unexpected: You might need a ride home or need some extra cash.
  • If you feel uncomfortable about a situation on a date, say "no" clearly and confidently. You're always allowed to change your mind about something, too. If someone likes and respects you, they'll back off. Don't worry: They will most likely ask you out again. If your date doesn't respect your decision, stay safe by leaving the situation.
  • Avoid drugs and alcohol while on a date.  Drugs and alcohol compromise your ability to make smart decisions and to escape dangerous situations. They can make you take risks you wouldn't usually take with your body, your car and your safety in general. They also prevent you from getting to know what your date is really like and keep your date from getting to know the real you.  Never accept a drink from someone.  Only drink from a glass that you have poured yourself.

Cell Phone/Internet

  • Do not give your cell phone number to people that you do not know.  Don't respond to text messages from numbers and people you don't know.
  • Do not take any cell phone pictures or video that is sexual in nature. First off, if they involve

nudity or partial nudity, they are illegal and classified as child pornography ‐ a felony offense in most states.  The intent of the parties does not matter, nor does whether permission was granted. Secondly, they have the tendency to get into the hands of the wrong people. Think about your reputation.

  • Do not send texts or capture pictures or video on your cell phone that you wouldn't feel comfortable sharing with your parents.  Ask yourself how you'd feel if the text you sent or the picture or video you captured were broadcast all across the school, and all across the Internet. Even if you personally don't send it around, others can and often do.
  • Keep your cell phone keypad locked (and the PIN or password safe and private), so that others can't grab it, unlock it, and use it to get you into trouble when you're not looking.
  • Be careful with on-line chat rooms/social media such as Facebook and Instagram.  If you do not know someone, do not communicate with them online.

 

Car Safety

  • Texting & Driving- It is dangerous!  Parents remember to set good example for your teen.  No text is worth losing your life over, or taking someone else's. If something is urgent, pull the vehicle over to a safe place before dealing with it.
  • Always wear your seat belt.
  • Never get into a car with someone who has been drinking or taking drugs.  If you have been drinking or taking drugs, do not drive!  Call a responsible person to get a ride home.  Parents - It is always a good idea to have an agreement with your teen for a no questions asked ride home policy.  If they call and are asking for a ride home, go and get them, but skip the 3rd degree.  Sit down with your teen a couple of days later and talk about it.

 

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Older School-Age and Early Teen Safety

Posted by Shelly
Shelly
Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
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on Thursday, January 09 2014
in School Age

Older School-Age & Early Teen Safety

  • Teen should always wear a seatbelt when riding in a car.
  • They should wear helmets when riding bikes, skateboards, rip sticks, or skating.
  • Talk to your teen about smoking, tobacco, drugs and alcohol use.  Also talk about the dangers of steroid and diet pill use.
  • Talk with your teen about non-violent ways to handle anger or fear.
  • Be aware of where your child is going and who they will be with.  It is always a good idea to have a parent close by at the mall, movies, parks, etc.  If your child wants to hang out with a friend, make sure that the other child’s parents will be home and that there will be adult supervision.
  • Teen parties should always be supervised by a responsible adult.
  • Encourage kids that they should  not give their cell phone number to people that they do not know.  Teach them not to respond to text messages from numbers and people that they don't know.
  • Talk with kids about what is appropriate.  Do not send texts or capture pictures or video on cell phones that they wouldn't feel comfortable sharing with their parents. Have them ask “how would I feel if that text or picture/video were broadcast all across the school, and all across the Internet.
  • Encourage kids to keep their cell phone keypad locked (and the PIN or password safe and private), so that others can't grab it, unlock it, and use it.
  • Monitor your child’s cell use and online activity.  Teach kids that on-line chat rooms/social media can be dangerous.   Tell your kids that if they do not know someone, do not communicate with them online or with texting.  Cyber bullying is real and happens every day.  Parents,  be aware of what is going on.

 

 

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Pre-School/School Age Safety

Posted by Shelly
Shelly
Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
User is currently offline
on Thursday, January 09 2014
in School Age

Pre-School/School Age  Safety

Car Seats

  • Children should remain in a 5 point harness car seat until they have reached the weight/height limits for the seat and then may move to a belt positioning booster.
  • Booster seats should be used until age 8 or when the child reaches 4 ft 9 in in height.

Stranger Danger

  • Talk to your children about the dangers of strangers.  Use role play to practice different scenarios in which they may encounter a stranger.

Fire Safety

  • Develop a fire safety plan for your family and practice.  Remind small children that a fire in your home is very scary, but that they should never hide under a bed or in a closet during a fire.
  • Allow children to help change the batteries of the smoke detectors.  Set off a test alarm so that everyone in the family knows what sound to listen for.
  • Practice stop, drop, and roll with your kids.

Water Safety

  • Teach your child how to swim, but never allow them to be near a pool alone.   Even good swimmers can have accidents!
  • If there is a time that you cannot find your child, check the pool or body of water first!!

General Safety

  • Helmets should always be used when children are playing on bikes, skates, skateboards, rip sticks, or any other riding toy.  Start this early so that your child gets used to always wearing their helmet.
  • Teach children their parent’s names, phone numbers, and address.  Practice this with them often so that they can easily recall the info.
  • Kids are very computer savvy now.  Monitor their use of computers, i-pads, and cell phones.  Use parental controls if possible.  You child can accidently access unwanted sites very easily.

 

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Toddler Safety

Posted by Shelly
Shelly
Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
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on Thursday, January 09 2014
in Toddlers

Toddler Safety

  • Choking hazards are a still a danger for toddlers.  Keep an eye out for small beads, coins, larger pieces of food etc.
  • Toddlers should remain rear facing in the car seat as long as possible, preferably until age 2.
  • Make sure that all electrical outlets have protective plugs.
  • Secure all cleaning supplies and medications in upper cabinets with cabinet locks.
  • Toddlers love to climb.  Be aware that they can and do, push chairs up to counters and can easily get onto your countertops.  Make sure that dressers, bookshelves, and other furniture is secured to the wall with furniture straps.
  • Keep all glass/crystal picture frames in a secure place where children cannot reach them.  Remember than frames can fall/break and children can easily get injured.
  • Keep children safe around bodies of water.
  • Never leave your child unattended while he/she is in the bath.
  • Keep stairs gated for the safety of your toddler.

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Series on Safety

Posted by Shelly
Shelly
Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
User is currently offline
on Thursday, January 09 2014
in General Info

Today we will be starting a series on safety by age group.  Please check back daily for new posts.

 

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Infant Safety

Posted by Shelly
Shelly
Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
User is currently offline
on Thursday, January 09 2014
in Infants

Infant Safety

  • Crib mattress should fit snugly into crib
  • All crib surfaces should be smooth
  • A bumper guard/pads should not be installed as this may contribute to a danger of suffocation
  • No pillows, stuffed animals, comforters or blankets  should be used in the crib
  • Lower the crib mattress to the lowest level before your child can get to a sitting position on his own
  • Never turn your back on the baby while changing a diaper, even if using the strap on the changing table
  • Infants should be placed in a rear facing infant car seat in a vehicle.   Check your car seat manufacturer guidelines on height/weight limits.  Most babies are ready to move to a rear facing convertible car seat between 6- 9 months of age.
  • Check frequently for safety recalls on your infant products.
  • Always be careful with toddlers and small babies.  Toddlers do not understand how strong they are and can hurt an infant accidentally.
  • Be careful of pets around infants.  A pet’s natural protective instinct is to scratch or bite and small children can accidentally get hurt.  Larger dogs can also unknowingly knock over bouncy seats, car seats, and swings.

 

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Welcome 2014!!!

Posted by Shelly
Shelly
Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
User is currently offline
on Wednesday, January 08 2014
in General Info

At the start of each new year, many of us wish for peace, health, and prosperity.   Here are some cute quotes found on Pinterest that may inspire you.

  • Dear Lord, All I ask for is a chance to prove that winning the lottery won't make me a bad person.  

if you don't win the lottery this year, you can wish for this...

  •  I dream of a better world where chickens can cross the road without having their motives questioned.  

for those who want to eat healthier in 2014...

  • You can't buy happiness, but you can buy cupcakes.  And that's kind of the same thing.
  • Chocolate comes from cocoa which comes out of a tree,  That makes it a plant.  Therefore, chocolate counts as salad.  The end.

And our final words of wisdom for the day...

-Do not spoil what you have by desiring what you have not;  but remember that what you now have was once among the things you only hoped for.

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Finger Foods for Babies

Posted by Shelly
Shelly
Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
User is currently offline
on Wednesday, January 08 2014
in Parenting Tips

By the time they're 9 months old, most babies have developed the fine motor skills — the small, precise movements — needed to pick up small pieces of food and feed themselves.

Allow your child to self-feed as much as possible, though you'll still be helping out by spoon-feeding cereal and other important dietary elements. Encouraging finger feeding helps your child learn about textures and independence.  If you have not already done so, it is time to introduce table/finger foods.  Do not limit your baby to just Gerber puffs.

By 9 months, most babies are ready to try table food and should be able to try many of the things that you eat.    Here are some suggestions.

  • Zucchini, carrots, potatoes, sweet potatoes, beans, or other well-cooked veggies.
  • Pieces of ripe banana, soft pears or peaches, and cooked apples
  • Well-cooked pasta
  • Dry cereals and crackers such as cheerios, graham crackers, & ritz crackers.  Ask yourself, does it melt in the mouth? Some dry cereals and crackers that are light and flaky will melt in the mouth.
  • Shredded cheeses  and  cottage cheese
  • Small pieces of soft, cooked beef and chicken are other good choices

Food should be cut into small pieces. The sizes will vary depending on the food's texture.   You should avoid the following foods that can be choking hazards.

  • Pieces of raw vegetables or hard fruits
  • Whole grapes, berries, cherry or grape tomatoes (instead, peel and slice or cut in quarters)
  • Raisins and other dried fruit
  • Peanuts, nuts, and seeds
  • Peanut butter and other nut or seed butters
  • Whole hot dogs and sausages (peel and cut these in very small pieces)
  • Untoasted bread, especially white bread that sticks together
  • Chunks of cheese or meat
  • Candy (hard candy, jelly beans, gummies, chewing gum)
  • Popcorn, pretzels, corn chips, and other snack foods
  • Marshmallows

If there is a topic that you would like more info on, email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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Eczema

Posted by Shelly
Shelly
Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
User is currently offline
on Tuesday, January 07 2014
in Info on illnesses

Atopic dermatitis (eczema) is a red itchy inflammation of the skin. It's a long-lasting (chronic) condition.  The cause of atopic dermatitis is not clear, but it affects the skin's ability to hold moisture. Skin becomes dry, itchy, and easily irritated.  Eczema may affect any area of the body, but it typically appears on the arms and behind the knees. It tends to flare periodically and then subside.

back_of_knees_eczema

There is no cure for eczema, but the goal in treating eczema is for a child to be comfortable.

  • Moisturize often. Creams work better than lotions.
  • Bathe with lukewarm water and for short periods daily.
  • Avoid things that trigger rashes, such as harsh soaps and detergents.
  • Control scratching. You may want to cover the rash with a bandage to keep your child from rubbing it. Put mittens or cotton socks on your baby's hands to help prevent him or her from scratching.  Oral antihistamines, such as Benadryl, can reduce the sensation of itching. Topical antihistamines are not recommended.
  • To treat the inflamed, itchy rash areas, most pediatricians and dermatologists will use very mild prescription strength cortisone (steroid) creams. These creams are applied two until the rash clears or the itching stops.

For more info on eczema visit, www.nationaleczema.org

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Infant seat, Convertible seat, Booster...How do I choose?

Posted by Shelly
Shelly
Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
User is currently offline
on Monday, January 06 2014
in General Info

We often get questions from parents about car seats.  When do I change car seats?  When can my child face front?  When can we stop using a car seat?  We hope that this info will answer some of those questions.

In this first stage, most parents use an infant carrier/car seat combo with base.  These safety seats are used only in the rear facing position for infants approximately 5-30 lbs and less than 30 in.  Most babies will use this type of seat until about 9-12 months of age.  These types of safety seats are convenient for parents, because they are easy to get the baby in and out of the car and can be used as an infant carrier.

infant carrier

Some parents chose to start with a convertible car seat.  Convertible car seats can be used in the rear facing position for infants weighing 5-30 lbs and can then be converted to forward facing for older children from 22-40lbs.  The benefit of this type of safety seat is that your child can use this seat from birth to about 40 lbs (about 4 years).  The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends keeping children rear facing until as close to age 2 as possible.  Many parents will use this type of safety seat from about 12 months to 4 years of age.

convertible car seat 2

Harness Booster safety seats can be used for children weighing 22-40lbs in the forward position only.  This seat uses the 5 point harness system and most harness booster seats will convert to belt positioning seats for children over 40 lbs.  This type of seat is good for children over 2yrs of age and will last your child for several years.

harness booster

Belt Positioning Booster seats elevate and position children so that the vehicle lap and shoulder belt fit them properly.  This type of seat is for those children who have outgrown their convertible or harness booster seats.  They are for kids over 40lbs.  Texas law requires that children stay in a belt positioning booster seats until they are 8 yrs old or until they reach 4ft 9in in height.

belt positionng boosterbooster

This information is intended to be a guide for parents.  Each manufacturer will have the specific weight and height limits on the side or back of the safety seat.  Be sure to check the guidelines for your specific car seat.  If there is a topic that you would like more info on, email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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Kids Punch for New Year's Eve

Posted by Shelly
Shelly
Shelly Nalbone is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who has worked with children fo
User is currently offline
on Monday, December 30 2013
in Recipes

Here is a recipe for the kids on New Year's Eve.

Pink Champagne Punch

1 12-ounce bottle white grape juice
1 6-ounce can frozen lemonade concentrate, thawed
1 16-ounce pkg. frozen whole strawberries, thawed
1 12-ounce can lemon-lime soda, chilled
8 cherries (optional)

Combine 1/2 of the grape juice, lemonade, and strawberries in a blender. Whirl until smooth and pour into drink container. Repeat steps 1 and 2 with remaining juice, lemonade, and strawberries. Add soda and stir well. Pour into 8 fancy plastic glasses. Add a cherry to the glass for garnish.

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